FAQs

Q: Who is Trip360?

A: Run by adventure fanatics and crazy outdoor lovers, we have stepped in the big boy shoes to give you the adventure of a lifetime. We are part of the company that brought the group holiday phenomenon to the world. That's right; our parent company is none other than Cox and Kings, the longest established travel company on the planet - 259 years and counting! Pioneering as we are, we thought of putting all our knowledge together to curate some fantastic experiences for you.

Our in-house team and multiple partners around the globe add the much required expertise in delivering each and every trip. The local area knowledge and the real-life experiences offer the most awe-inspiring selection of trips. These trips could have authentic accommodation, exotic cuisine, local transport, and many different experiences to get you out of your comfort zone and face-to-face with the planet's people, cultures, landscapes and wildlife.

Q: Why should I choose tours by Trip360?

A: Someone once said,"Life begins outside your comfort zone."We at Trip360 totally agree.

You should choose our trips if you're someone who seeks a 'real-life' travel experience. If you have a particular interest - be it culinary adventures, scuba diving, cycling, trekking, or motorbiking trips, look no further.

Q: Why style of trip is right for me?

A: You will need to be sufficiently fit if you want to rough it out on a really steep cycling trail or a high altitude trek in a remote location. The Physical Rating of such tours will be on the higher side. If you feel you're not ready for such tours, you could choose something easier, with a lower Physical Rating.

Q: Are these tours operated by Trip360?


A: These trips are operated by Trip360 in association with our awesome local partners.

Q: Is this trip for me?

A: If you've always loved the water and wanted to know what it's like underneath the surface, then there is no time like the present to learn how to breathe underwater! We have trips for absolute beginners who have never been diving before, newly certified divers and even advanced divers who are looking at getting a few more dives under their belt. Trust us, if feel a close affinity to the water and are a strong swimmer, learning to dive will be as easy as walking for you.

Q: What are the requirements to Scuba dive and to earn my diving certification?

A: There are some requirements to become a Dive certified scuba diver.

Age Limits:
In most areas, you must be at least 10 years old before you can go scuba diving. Student divers (below 15 years) earn the PADI Junior Open Water Diver certification, which can later be upgraded to PADI Open Water Diver certification. Children below the age of 13 need consent from a parent or guardian to enroll for PADI eLearning or to make use of PADI Open Water Diver Touch™.

Medical Fitness
:
All student divers need to finish a concise scuba medical questionnaire with details of medical history and any medical conditions that may be a problem while diving. If you are good to go, sign the form to begin the process. If you do have a medical condition, you need a medical certificate from your doctor which claims you are eligible to dive. In certain areas, the law demands all scuba students to consult with a physician prior to enrolling for the course.

Basic Swimming & Floating Skills:
In order to be eligible for certification, you will be tested by your dive professional for certain performance requirements. You will be assessed on the basis of:
A 200 metres/yards swim or a 300 metres/yard swim with mask, fins and snorkel (no limit on time and swimming style)
Your ability to float in water for 10 minutes (any style)
With the help of certain adaptive techniques, even individuals with severe physical challenges can meet these requirements and participate. It is not uncommon for people with paraplegia, amputations and other challenges to earn a PADI Open Water Diver certification. Ask your dive professional for more details.

Q: Do I have to be a good swimmer to scuba dive?


A: In order to be eligible for certification, you will be tested by your dive professional for certain performance requirements. You will be assessed on the basis of:
A 200 metres/yards swim or a 300 metres/yard swim with mask, fins and snorkel (no time limit and any swimming stroke)
Your ability to float in water for 10 minutes (any method)
With the help of certain adaptive techniques, even individuals with severe physical challenges can meet these requirements and participate in diving. It is not uncommon for people with paraplegia, amputations and other challenges to earn the PADI Open Water Diver certification. Ask your dive professional for more details!
 
Q: How do I learn to scuba dive?

A: Getting a scuba diving certificate involves three steps:

Theory First

Through the initial process of your scuba diving course, you'll learn the basic principles of scuba diving. These include what to keep in mind while planning a dive, the right scuba gear for you and how to choose it, and signals used to communicate underwater, along with other diving procedures. You'll also have instructional videos apart from practice diving sessions in a swimming pool (or a pool-like environment). To ensure that you have a thorough knowledge of scuba diving basics, there will a final exam at the end of the course.

Confined Dives

After theory, the main focus turns to practice dives in a swimming pool or in confined waters (similar to a pool), like the waters off a calm beach. Apart from being comfortable with your gear and staying underwater, you'll also learn how to set up your scuba gear, remove water from your mask, get in and out of the water, regulate buoyancy, navigate under water, and important safety procedures.

Open-Water Dives

Once your instructor feels you're comfortable underwater, you'll begin with open-water dives. Head out to open waters, where your instructor will guide you through four dives over two days.

Q: How deep can we go?

A: The limit for recreational scuba diving is 40 metres/130 feet, with beginners restricted to depths of 18 metres/60 feet. However, most popular diving is done at depths of less than 12 metres/40 feet to take advantage of the warm, water bright colours.

Q: Can I scuba dive even if I have an ear condition, diabetes, asthma, allergies or other issues?


A: Conditions related to the ear, sinus, respiratory, or cardio functions, or conditions that may affect consciousness are concerns. However, at the end of the day, only a doctor can evaluate an individual's risks. Doctors consult the Divers Alert Network (DAN) when assessing a person's physical eligibility to dive.

Q: What are the most common injuries or sicknesses associated with diving?

A: Most divers face sunburn, seasickness and dehydration, but these can be prevented easily. Added precautions such as wearing an exposure suit, staying off the seabed, and watching where you put your hands and feet can help you avoid injuries under water.

Q: Are there any special concerns that women need to be aware of?

A: While menstruation is not a concern, pregnancy certainly is. Since little is known about the negative effects of diving on a foetus, pregnant women, or those trying to conceive, are advised to avoid diving.

Q: What happens if I use up all my air?

A: Proper training on how to check the air gauge makes this situation unlikely, especially as air gauges are part of your basic diving kit. However, if you do run out of air on a dive, use your buddy's extra regulator (mouthpiece) to share their air supply long enough to swim to the surface. Additionally, your training will cover the basic options to help you deal with such emergency situations.